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Counter Strike: Global Offensive

Team Ranking: May 2021 | HLTV.org

Last month was all about the Regional Major Ranking (RMR) tournaments. These Major qualifying events, held globally, were responsible for some of the biggest changes in the top 30, including mousesports jumping to sixth, their highest ranking in exactly a year, and Akuma entering the top 20 on the back of a controversial third-place finish in EPIC League CIS.

Despite the RMR setback, NAVI moved up to second thanks to their DH Masters Spring triumph

But the RMRs were far from being the sole top-tier tournaments that were held in May. Earlier in the month, Natus Vincere added the DreamHack Masters Spring title to their collection after beating fellow CIS side Gambit in the final, moving up to second because of it. And Fiend were rewarded for their grind as they jumped to 25th – their highest-ever ranking – on the back of deep runs in LOOT.BET Season 9 and Spring Sweet Spring 2.

Roster changes also cost some teams inside the top 30 precious points. FURIA dropped down two places after benching Paytyn “⁠junior⁠” Johnson and promoting Lucas “⁠honda⁠” Cano to the starting lineup, while FaZe saw their ranking sink to 39th after moving Marcelo “⁠coldzera⁠” David to the bench.

Here’s a summary of our ranking for new readers:

Our team ranking is based on teams’ achievements over the past year (with severe decay in points throughout each month), recent form over the last two months, and performance in recent events in the last 3 months.

Each team is required to have a three-man core in order to retain their points. Due to the ongoing coronavirus outbreak, online results, which previously had a minimal effect, now carry more weight as they are also included in the ‘Achievements’ and ‘Recent Events’ sub-categories.

Below is the current top 30 table as of June 7, which goes more in-depth into how the points are distributed — or you can check our special page, where you will be able to find the latest, weekly version of our ranking. You can see the lineup for each team by hovering over their name in the table.

1.

500

200

273

973

2.

418

127

240

785

+2

3.

359

107

300

766

-1

4.

282

179

199

660

+4

5.

351

49

122

522

-2

6.

207

155

134

496

+8

7.

279

105

98

482

-1

8.

275

79

98

452

-3

9.

225

58

139

422

-2

10.

147

101

126

374

+3

11.

236

60

77

373

-2

12.

213

82

64

359

13.

163

80

81

324

-3

14.

168

81

49

298

-3

15.

74

148

47

269

+6

16.

94

125

43

262

17.

68

122

45

235

+8

18.

77

83

57

217

-3

19.

66

75

52

193

20.

32

76

64

172

+118

21.

19

107

14

140

-1

22.

55

37

46

138

-5

23.

36

54

17

107

+11

24.

32

56

19

107

-1

25.

15

79

12

106

+33

26.

27

42

33

102

+23

27.

18

66

16

100

+9

28.

32

36

29

97

-4

29.

63

15

16

94

-3

30.

51

29

12

92

-8

Please note that the +/- gain on this table differs from our weekly rankings page, and it is related to the ranking update of May 3.

mousesports return to the top 10

mousesports‘ ranking hovered around the 15th position in the weeks that followed Christopher “⁠dexter⁠” Nong‘s addition as in-game leader, so it’s understandable that expectations surrounding this team were modest heading into Flashpoint 3, the first Regional Major Ranking (RMR) tournament of the year in Europe.

The international team raised eyebrows with a first-place finish in the closed qualifier, only losing a close three-map affair with Complexity, and then they took it up another notch in the main tournament. Clean victories over fnatic, BIG, Astralis and G2 earned mousesports a spot in the grand final, in which they were able to prevail 2-1 – the only time that they dropped a map in the entire event.

frozen was mousesports’ top performer in Flashpoint 3 (1.35 rating)

The Flashpoint prize – mousesports‘ first relevant trophy in this online era – seems almost secondary to the renewed sense of belief in the team, who are looking like a serious contender heading into IEM Cologne. After a rough start to his European adventure, dexter is starting to silence his critics by putting up the sort of numbers that many expected from him when he took over from Finn “⁠karrigan⁠” Andersen, and extracting great performances from his star players, Robin “⁠ropz⁠” Kool and David “⁠frozen⁠” Čerňanský.

FaZe plummet to a new low

These are tough times to be a FaZe fan. The team seemed to be on the right track when it landed Russel “⁠Twistzz⁠” Van Dulken and re-signed karrigan, but four months on from the Danish tactician’s return, the outlook is still bleak.

FaZe had looked far from an elite team in their first tournaments with karrigan, but only a few would have predicted them to crash out of DreamHack Masters Spring and Flashpoint 3 in last place, though it should be pointed out that their matches were decided by fine margins and could have gone their way.

When will fans get to see the FaZe team they were promised in February?

In the end, the challenges proved insurmountable for FaZe, who are starting to plan for a future without coldzera. The Brazilian will see out his contract on the bench while he analyses his options for a return to competition after the player break.

The recent run of poor form, combined with coldzera‘s exit, sees the team nosedive to 39th, which is by far the worst ranking of any FaZe lineup. karrigan‘s troops will return to action in a week’s time in the BLAST Premier Spring Final, and at this point there is nothing that fans can do except hope for better days.

G2 edge closer to the top three

G2 momentarily dipped out of the top 10 in the rankings when Kenny “⁠kennyS⁠” Schrub was removed from the starting lineup, but the team led by Nemanja “⁠nexa⁠” Isaković has since skyrocketed as the return of Audric “⁠JaCkz⁠” Jug has blessed the squad with a fresh approach to the game and a renewed sense of confidence. Since then, the French-Balkan side has gained brilliant form and consistency, making a semi-final run in DreamHack Masters Spring and finishing third in Flashpoint 3 before topping their IEM Summer group.

G2 are closing in on the top teams with a string of deep tournament runs

G2 were only beaten by one team in DreamHack Master Spring, Gambit, in both the group stage and the playoffs, taking the scalps of several of the world’s best teams in Spirit, Virtus.pro, mousesports and Astralis. Later in the month, they were able to start Flashpoint 3 with a 3-0 record thanks to victories over FaZe, Heroic and NIP, but they then suffered defeats against the two finalists, mousesports and NIP, in the upper bracket and consolidation finals.

G2 still added more form points to their tally in the first week of June at IEM Summer as they secured another top-four finish with a clean run in the group stage that puts them straight into the tournament’s semi-finals. Nikola “⁠NiKo⁠” Kovač and company went 5-1 in maps during the group stage, dropping only an Ancient game to FunPlus Phoenix because of an otherworldly display from Pavle “⁠Maden⁠” Bošković .

EXTREMUM bounce back after RMR bronze

EXTREMUM have recently found comfort in their home away from home, North America, where they got some respite with a third-place finish in cs_summit 8 following a tough start to the year in Europe that saw the team take a dive in the ranking. Aleksandar “⁠kassad⁠” Trifunović’s men, who have struggled to find the same form they had when Justin “⁠jks⁠” Savage was still on the team, are now in 23rd place, just one below their best position since linking up with Hansel “⁠BnTeT⁠” Ferdinand at the beginning of the year.

EXTREMUM are once again within shot of the top 20

After dropping to 41st place in April, Aaron “⁠AZR⁠” Ward and company were able to find some better results with playoff runs in FunSpark ULTI Europe Regional Series 1 and Spring Sweet Spring 1 to stop their fall before returning to North America in May, but it was the cs_summit 8 showing that put EXTREMUM back on track and on a clear upward trajectory.

EXTREMUM started out their run at the RMR tournament with a 0-2 loss to Extra Salt, one of the more in-shape teams in North America, but they were then able to find their footing. In their cs_summit 8 gauntlet they took revenge on Extra Salt, beat Bad News Bears, took a map in the series against Liquid, and won 2-0 against Vito “⁠kNgV-⁠” Giuseppe’s O PLANO before finally falling to FURIA and settling for third place.

fnatic continue to spiral downwards

fnatic’s woes continue as the core of Jesper “⁠JW⁠” Wecksell, Freddy “⁠KRIMZ⁠” Johansson and Ludvig “⁠Brollan⁠” Brolin is at its lowest ranking in history, which was previously set at No.28 in September 2019. Having fallen out of the top 20 again in April, the Swedish squad now sit in 29th place following last-place finishes at Flashpoint 3 and IEM Summer. They were also invited to the Spring Sweet Spring 1 and 2 playoffs, where they were knocked out in the semi-finals by EPG Family in the former and in the quarter-finals by Fiend in the latter.

fnatic’s JW, KRIMZ and Brollan are at their nadir as a core

The Black and Orange began 2021 on a high note with a second-place finish at cs_summit 7 after bringing in Jack “⁠Jackinho⁠” Ström Mattsson in lieu of Robin “⁠flusha⁠” Rönnquist, but ever since then, JW and company have chained a series of poor performances leading to consistent early exits at events. fnatic have gone out in last place in three of their four most important tournaments this year after their cs_summit 7 showing, namely the IEM Katowice Play-In, Flashpoint 3 and IEM Summer, and finished near-last in the fourth, ESL Pro League, in 17-20th place.

Their results in the bigger events they played in May and early June, Flashpoint 3 and IEM Summer, are a continuation of a trend that continues nabated. fnatic showed with four straight defeats at the hands of mousesports, Complexity, Virtus.pro and NIP — with only one map won out of eight —, that the problems run deep. The last time things got this bad for the trio of JW, KRIMZ and Brollan, they made two changes, letting go of Richard “⁠Xizt⁠” Landström and Simon “⁠twist⁠” Eliasson to bring back Maikil “⁠Golden⁠” Selim and flusha, after which they soared in the rankings from No.28 to No.4 in a month’s time.

Lucas Aznar Miles contributed to this story

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Counter Strike: Global Offensive

Team Ranking: March 2021 | HLTV.org

March featured the world’s best teams competing in the only elite event of the month, ESL Pro League Season 13, while tournaments such as the Pinnacle Cup, Snow Sweet Snow, and DreamHack Open March filled in the gaps with mixed levels of competition.

Results in qualifiers for BLAST Premier Spring Showdown and DreamHack Masters Spring also influenced changes, albeit to a smaller degree as they only impacted the Form sub-category.

Vitality remain in the top 6, but a drop in the rankings is looming

Similarly, ESL Pro League results have only affected the team’s Form as the tournament is still running and placements weren’t taken into account for the ranking update of April 5. Therefore, the upper half of the top 30 stays relatively unchanged from last month’s update, but massive shifts are expected soon following the event’s conclusion as teams such as Complexity, FURIA, and ENCE made deep runs.

Big jumps are seen in the bottom half of the top-30, starting with HAVU, who are up 39 spots after winning 24 of the 28 matches played in March. Making similar strides were AGO, Copenhagen Flames, and SKADE, all rising at least 20 positions in the ranking, while Extra Salt showed promise ahead of their European trip by dominating North American opponents and climbing to number 21.

Here’s a summary of our ranking for new readers:

Our team ranking is based on teams’ achievements over the past year (with severe decay in points throughout each month), recent form over the last two months, and performance in recent events in the last 3 months.

Each team is required to have a three-man core in order to retain their points. Due to the ongoing coronavirus outbreak, online results, which previously had a minimal effect, now carry more weight as they are also included in the ‘Achievements’ and ‘Recent Events’ sub-categories.

Below is the current top 30 table as of April 5, which goes more in-depth into how the points are distributed — or you can check our special page, where you will be able to find the latest, weekly version of our ranking. You can see the lineup for each team by hovering over their name in the table.

1.

437

75

300

812

+1

2.

500

87

193

780

-1

3.

277

200

203

680

+1

4.

267

128

200

595

-1

5.

258

122

150

530

+1

6.

356

33

78

467

-1

7.

177

96

148

421

+1

8.

287

28

80

395

-1

9.

152

117

68

337

+2

10.

158

91

57

306

-1

11.

134

83

62

279

-1

12.

124

106

47

277

+2

13.

114

66

64

244

-1

14.

104

48

70

222

-1

15.

93

66

59

218

+3

16.

40

103

49

192

+39

17.

64

60

62

186

+2

18.

91

26

47

164

-3

19.

85

13

64

162

-3

20.

92

39

24

155

-3

21.

20

86

33

139

+7

22.

9

82

10

101

23.

12

52

25

89

+21

24.

23

52

14

89

-3

25.

10

47

23

80

+9

26.

9

58

11

78

+34

27.

18

51

7

76

-4

28.

1

73

2

76

+23

29.

6

65

4

75

+4

30.

17

51

5

73

-4

Please note that the +/- gain on this table differs from our weekly rankings page, and it is related to the ranking update of March 1.

All quiet on the northern front

The latest monthly update brings little change in the elite ranks because the sole Big Event that was held in March, the ESL Pro League Season 13, is still underway and, as such, only affected the Form sub-category. Natus Vincere may have regained the top spot from Astralis, but they could soon take a big hit after crashing out of EPL in the first round of the playoffs. The Danes are hot on NAVI’s heels, but they’ll need to be wary of the threat posed by Gambit, who have gained over 100 points since the previous update and will want to continue to make history.

NAVI reclaimed top spot — but for how long?

One change of note sees Vitality lose their place in the top five for the first time since June. The French side ended 2020 among the best, but this year has not been kind to them, with only one playoff appearance so far, in the BLAST Premier Global Final. ESL Pro League, their first event since returning to a five-man setup, ended in disaster as they finished fourth in their group, behind NIP, ENCE and G2, and a similar frustrating story in the BLAST Premier Spring Showdown is likely to raise serious questions about the direction in which the team is heading.

Dream month for HAVU

The Finnish squad was quick to find success after reforming their roster at the start of the year, but they hit a new level in March to break into the top 30 and place as high as 16th. Carrying the banner as the only Finnish team competing against the best, HAVU have surpassed the now-international ENCE by a significant margin, spurred on by their rival’s former duo of Jani “⁠Aerial⁠” Jussila and Sami “⁠xseveN⁠” Laasanen.

Aerial is a reformed player after leaving ENCE

The two riflers were brilliant in March, averaging 1.25 and 1.19 ratings respectively, followed by the team’s primary AWPer, Lasse “⁠ZOREE⁠” Uronen, at 1.17 and the in-game leader, Olli “⁠sLowi⁠” Pitkänen, at 1.11. Strong form across the board translated into a 47-14 map win-loss record over the course of the month, during which the team secured series wins over NIP, ENCE, and BIG. The Finns also managed to take a map off of a red-hot Gambit in the final of the Pinnacle cup, ending the Russians’ winning streak on Mirage in the process.

Although HAVU didn’t attend ESL Pro League Season 13, where the cream of the crop was competing last month, the victory in Snow Sweet Snow 2 and the runner-up finish in the Pinnacle Cup, along with upsets over top teams, saw the team hit this important milestone.

fnatic’s woes continue

After moving down four places to 16th in last month’s update, fnatic find themselves almost out of the top 20 after a disappointing run in ESL Pro League, in which the Swedes finished fifth in their group, with only one win from five matches. Their weaknesses were on display once again as they couldn’t even take a map in any of the series that they lost — while their sole victory against Evil Geniuses was a three-map affair —, finishing the group stage with a -52 round record, the second-worst overall.

fnatic must go back to the drawing board

fnatic‘s fortunes seem to have reversed after a promising start to the year following Jack “⁠Jackinho⁠” Ström Mattsson‘s arrival, and they find themselves in the midst of one of the biggest crises in the team’s history. With roster changes ruled out for the time being, the Swedish team has opted for a role swap hoping that it will help them to stop the bleeding, with Jackinho currently being tested as the squad’s main AWPer.

Snow Sweet Snow 3 is the next event on the calendar for the Swedish team, who will be hoping to pick up some form and momentum ahead of the first Regional Major Ranking (RMR) tournament of the year. The following weeks will be very challenging for fnatic, whose rank could take a nosedive soon as they will miss the next big event, DreamHack Masters Spring, as well as the BLAST Premier Spring Showdown.

SKADE, Copenhagen Flames hit new peaks

Denmark’s most successful “farm team”, Copenhagen Flames, has done it again. After selling the likes of Fredrik “⁠roeJ⁠” Jørgensen, René “⁠TeSeS⁠” Madsen, Asger “⁠Farlig⁠” Jensen, Rasmus “⁠HooXi⁠” Nielsen, and Ismail “⁠refrezh⁠” Ali , the organization’s new squad, led by returning in-game leader Asger “⁠AcilioN⁠” Larsen, has broken into the top 30 and currently sits at No.26.

The young and unproven roster took down a big few names in March, most notably Gambit in their semi-final run in Snow Sweet Snow 2, inflicting the Russian team’s first defeat since February 18, with Endpoint, SAW, MIBR, and TeamOne some of the other teams who fell short against the Danes.

SKADE may not have the glamour of Copenhagen Flames, but they are starting to build a reputation of their own in the second tier of European competition. Following a 13-15th place in Snow Sweet Snow 2 at the start of the month, the team that recently added WESG 2018 Global Finals MVP Georgi “⁠SHiPZ⁠” Grigorov to the fold went on an incredible run.

A victory over fellow Bulgarian side FATE kicked off a 16-series winning streak across multiple tournaments that saw SKADE take down the likes of LDLC, Anonymo, and Winstrike. The team will hope to extend that streak in Snow Sweet Snow 3, in which a struggling mousesports team is the only thing standing between them and a top-four finish.

Extra Salt soar ahead of European test

After a rough month for North American Counter-Strike, Extra Salt‘s rise to 21st in the rankings gives fans in the region something to cheer about. Johnny “⁠JT⁠” Theodosiou‘s side have established themselves as the prime force in NA after winning five tournaments in a row, losing only one match all month long (0-2 defeat to Bad News Bears in ESEA Premier).

Extra Salt cannot afford to rest on their laurels, however, and have just landed in Belgrade, Serbia, for a demanding sequence of European tournaments that will see them take on some of the world’s best teams in the BLAST Premier Spring Showdown, FunSpark ULTI and DreamHack Masters Spring. It’s going to be a completely different ball game now, but they’ll be relishing the challenge that lies ahead.

Luís “MIRAA” Mira contributed to this story

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Counter Strike: Global Offensive

Team Ranking: February 2021 | HLTV.org

Fans could enjoy plenty of top-tier action in February. The three BLAST Premier Spring Groups was where it began last month, but the biggest driving force behind the month’s ranking changes was the IEM Katowice Play-in and the $1,000,000 main tournament in the latter half of the month, of course, as it boasted extra-stacked competition with 16 out of the top 20 teams in attendance.

Gambit gained the most as the surprise winners of IEM Katowice

At the lower tier, teams fought in the first edition of Snow Sweet Snow and in the second European Development Championship, while the 36th season of ESEA Premier started picking up speed with close to half of the group stage matches now done and dusted.

Here’s a summary of our ranking for new readers:

Our team ranking is based on teams’ achievements over the past year (with severe decay in points throughout each month), recent form over the last two months, and performance in recent events in the last 3 months.

Each team is required to have a three-man core in order to retain their points. Due to the ongoing coronavirus outbreak, online results, which previously had a minimal effect, now carry more weight as they are also included in the ‘Achievements’ and ‘Recent Events’ sub-categories.

Below is the current top 30 table as of March 1, which goes more in-depth into how the points are distributed — or you can check our special page, where you will be able to find the latest, weekly version of our ranking. You can see the lineup for each team by hovering over their name in the table.

1.

500

88

300

888

2.

434

168

228

830

+1

3.

252

194

169

615

+3

4.

226

200

141

567

+12

5.

371

47

145

563

-3

6.

249

133

143

525

-1

7.

288

82

119

489

-3

8.

165

170

104

439

+6

9.

164

54

71

289

+1

10.

161

71

55

287

-2

11.

157

63

51

271

+2

12.

116

79

51

246

+6

13.

111

65

49

225

+2

14.

132

51

39

222

-7

15.

89

65

56

210

-4

16.

88

62

60

210

-4

17.

128

41

41

210

-8

18.

98

58

41

197

+1

19.

51

59

75

185

-2

20.

33

47

27

107

21.

15

77

11

103

+4

22.

1

75

0

76

+13

23.

10

37

28

75

-2

24.

0

73

0

73

+6

25.

21

0

47

68

+1

26.

18

42

6

66

+2

27.

2

59

2

63

+2

28.

6

56

0

62

+10

29.

10

28

16

54

-5

30.

10

35

9

54

-3

Please note that the +/- gain on this table differs from our weekly rankings page, and it is related to the ranking update of February 1.

Gambit, Virtus.pro, and Spirit shatter status quo at IEM Katowice

IEM Katowice brought many surprises from the beginning of the Play-in to the end of the tournament. To the joy of CIS Counter-Strike fans, the typically NAVI-dominated region had three other names in play in the prestigious tournament and they all outplaced Aleksandr “⁠s1mple⁠” Kostyliev‘s squad after all four teams made it to the playoffs stage, taking down some of the biggest names present in the process.

Gambit spearheaded those efforts as the surprise champions, as they came back from an opening loss to Evil Geniuses in the group stage to go undefeated from that point on, beating the new mousesports squad, Heroic, and G2, as well as each of their three regional rivals in the playoffs — Natus Vincere, Spirit, and Virtus.pro — with stunning confidence. As a result, originally the lowest-ranked team at the tournament, Dmitry “⁠sh1ro⁠” Sokolov & co. jumped 15 spots compared to the beginning of the tournament, all the way to fourth place in the ranking.

Virtus.pro improved on their peak placing last month with the runners-up finish in IEM after displaying just as much drive up until the grand final, securing wins over teams like Vitality, Astralis, and Liquid over the course of the tournament before their eventual demise at the hands of Gambit. Meanwhile, still quite fresh off changes after adding star AWPer Abdul “⁠degster⁠” Gasanov, Spirit lost just two maps en route to the playoffs with victories against much more established teams like BIG and Astralis, until they also ran into the red-hot Gambit in the semis.

With the unprecedented success, the CIS region now has three out of the top four teams with Natus Vincere, Virtus.pro, and Gambit breathing down Astralis‘ necks, as well as a fourth in the top eight in Spirit, which is more than they had ever had in the ranking’s history.

Vitality’s top-three streak ends

One of a number of teams who took part in both of February’s top-tier events were Vitality, and they ended the month all the worse for it, as their four months long streak as a top-three team came to an end following the Frenchmen’s unsuccessful run in BLAST Premier Spring Groups and the similarly disappointing group stage elimination from IEM Katowice just a couple of weeks later.

Vitality struggled amid apEX’s personal woes

The team now sits in fifth place, the lowest since mid-October, after the consecutive early exits. That would normally ring alarm bells, had it not been for Dan “⁠apEX⁠” Madesclaire‘s mysterious personal issues that saw the in-game leader placed on the sidelines by coach Rémy “⁠XTQZZZ⁠” Quoniam for a few days and miss out on the second match of the former tournament in the meantime, with Nabil “⁠Nivera⁠” Benrlitom stepping in for the entire Evil Geniuses series at BLAST.

The pressure is now on Mathieu “⁠ZywOo⁠” Herbaut & co. to perform when they come back to play in the upcoming ESL Pro League Season 13, where the French squad will have a chance to save face and regain their place in the top three throughout March and early April.

OG, Heroic out of top 10 amid roster changes

OG have gone from being on the fringe of the top five teams in the world at the turn of the year after peaking at No.6 and plateauing for several months, to falling out of the top 10 in February. The season didn’t start off great for the international squad, who finished 5-8th at cs_summit 7 in January, and February brought no better results for the team led by Aleksi “⁠Aleksib⁠” Virolainen, as they started it off by falling in last place at BLAST Spring Premier Groups with losses to Astralis and BIG.

A successful IEM Katowice 2021 Play-In bid with victories over fnatic and Cloud9 gleamed a ray of hope on OG, but they ended up eliminated after two straight 0-2 losses to FaZe and Vitality at the main event, ending in the dismissal of Nathan “⁠NBK-⁠” Schmitt. Now on the market for a fifth, OG could be unveiling Nikolaj “⁠niko⁠” Kristensen as a replacement for the recently departed French player, which would reunite the Dane with his former North teammate, Valdemar “⁠valde⁠” Bjørn Vangså, and OpTic coach, Casper “⁠ruggah⁠” Due. Whether the reported move pans out or not, OG will be banking on a change to regain their lost footing with ESL Pro League looming large on the horizon.

Will changing players help OG shatter their ceiling?

Heroic touched the sky when they reached the top spot in the ranking following their ESL One Cologne and DreamHack Open Fall victories last season, but the Danes haven’t been able to curb a slow and steady decline that began at the end of last year. To try and stop the bleeding, Heroic decided to make two changes to the roster and removed Johannes “⁠b0RUP⁠” Borup and niko, dropping seven positions from last month in the process and falling out of the top 10 for the first time since their meteoric rise in the summer of 2020.

The changes that followed a respectable 3-4th place at cs_summit 7 in January and the 9-12th place finish at IEM Katowice in February broke a ten-month period of stability in the Danish squad, who have now acquired Rasmus “⁠sjuush⁠” Beck and Ismail “⁠refrezh⁠” Ali to shake things up, although looking back on their exit from the latter of the two tournaments it wasn’t as hard of a fall as could have been perceived when it happened, as their two defeats came at the hands of two of the event’s standout teams — Gambit, the winners of it all, and semi-finalists Spirit. Looking ahead the Danes will have their eyes set on returning to the top positions in the ranking, but so will a slew of teams packed around them in the leaderboard, many of which are in similar situations and carry the same ambitions, including OG.

forZe, EXTREMUM drop out of top 30

forZe broke the top 30 barrier for the first time on New Year’s eve in 2018 and remained around the top 20-30 throughout most of 2019, dropping below that threshold just briefly before peaking at No.12 in September following a second-place finish at BLAST Pro Series Moscow. They remained a top 15 team after that high point until play moved online in early 2020 due to the coronavirus pandemic and their form decreased dramatically. forZe then struggled and dropped in the ranking, once again returning to the verge of falling out of the top 30. Roster movements finally ensued at the turn of 2021 and the team settled on two new players in February to try and revamp a roster that wasn’t bouncing back to their pre-2020 form.

The Russian squad, with Aleksandr “⁠zorte⁠” Zagodyrenko and Aleksandr “⁠KENSI⁠” Gurkin in lieu of Dmitriy “⁠facecrack⁠” Alekseyev and Bogdan “⁠xsepower⁠” Chernikov, weren’t able to curb the top 30 exit, however, falling to No.31 as they couldn’t show improved form immediately in their first month together. The renewed roster ended February with two ESEA Premier losses to SAW and Apeks and two quarter-final exits, at Snow Sweet Snow 1, where they lost two close maps to FunPlus Phoenix after winning the opening map, and at European Development Championship 2, where they were once again edged out, albeit that time around by Nemiga.

AZR and company have fallen out of the top 30 for the first time with this core

EXTREMUM, the spiritual successor of 100 Thieves with Hansel “⁠BnTeT⁠” Ferdinand in the place of Justin “⁠jks⁠” Savage, played their first tournament since reuniting at Snow Sweet Snow 1, but the results were less optimistic than expected as they came in 13-15th place in the tournament’s Swiss stage. The international squad have since dipped below the top 30, falling two spots beneath it, which marks a first for this core since coming together in October of 2018 — when Jay “⁠Liazz⁠” Tregillgas and Sean “⁠Gratisfaction⁠” Kaiwai first linked up with Aaron “⁠AZR⁠” Ward and Joakim “⁠jkaem⁠” Myrbostad in Renegades and were ranked 30th.

Not competing at ESL Pro League, EXTREMUM will have an easier tournament to try and bounce back at after their Snow Sweet Snow 1 losses to GODSENT, Winstrike and forZe; the Pinnacle Cup, where they will face teams of a similar calibre to track their progress and potentially even get a chance to rematch two of the aforementioned teams. Aleksandar “⁠kassad⁠” Trifunović’s men will be kicking off their run in the tournament against Wisla Krakow in the first round of the tournament’s Swiss group stage on Sunday, March 7.

Chance to soar for packed middle of the field

Six teams are in a fraught battle in the middle of the leaderboard, packed within 30 points of each other between No.13 and No.18 in the ranking, with NIP not far ahead in 12th place and FunPlus Phoenix right behind in 19th place. All six of the teams, Evil Geniuses, Heroic, mousesports, fnatic, OG and FaZe, as well as those directly above and below, will be competing at ESL Pro League Season 13 — the biggest tournament taking place in March with all top 20 teams in contention except Spirit —, and will have a chance to set themselves apart from the peloton by posting a strong result at the stacked event.

mouz, fnatic and OG are all within less than point of each other

All of the teams in this tightly crammed group have been afflicted by roster changes since the beginning of the year, be it earlier this season season or right before going into ESL’s flagship league, and will be eager to show up big against direct competition as they will all be facing one or more close rivals in the round robin group stage, including Heroic, OG and FunPlus Phoenix meeting in Group A; NIP, FaZe and mousesports clashing in Group B; and Evil Geniuses and fnatic engaging in Group D.

Lucas Aznar Miles contributed to this story

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Counter Strike: Global Offensive

Team Ranking: January 2021 | HLTV.org

January brought the return of top-tier Counter-Strike after the player break as BLAST hosted the global final of its 2020 Premier circuit, featuring $1 million in prize money and eight teams, six of which inside the top 10 in the rankings. Natus Vincere ran rampant in the tournament and put in some performances reminiscent of last year’s IEM Katowice campaign, but it was not enough for them to overtake Astralis or Vitality in the world rankings, although the second place is now within their grasp.

One of the month’s winners was Virtus.pro, who added the cs_summit 7 trophy to the Flashpoint 2 and DreamHack Open December titles that they had won at the tail end of 2020. The CIS team, who did not drop a single map throughout the tournament, are now sixth in the world, their highest rank since November 2019.

NAVI won the first big tournament of 2021, the BLAST Premier Global Final

Smaller tournaments, such as DreamHack Open January and the OMEN WGR European Challenge, also had an impact in the lower half of the top 30, with Spirit moving up to No.14 despite making a roster change, and Dignitas, Movistar Riders and Sinners all making this month’s table.

Here’s a summary of our ranking for new readers:

Our team ranking is based on teams’ achievements over the past year (with severe decay in points throughout each month), recent form over the last two months, and performance in recent events in the last 3 months.

Each team is required to have a three-man core in order to retain their points. Due to the ongoing coronavirus outbreak, online results, which previously had a minimal effect, now carry more weight as they are also included in the ‘Achievements’ and ‘Recent Events’ sub-categories.

Below is the current top 30 table as of February 1, which goes more in-depth into how the points are distributed — or you can check our special page, where you will be able to find the latest, weekly version of our ranking. You can see the lineup for each team by hovering over their name in the table.

1.

500

200

300

1000

2.

411

110

263

784

3.

382

152

246

780

4.

266

87

134

487

5.

167

95

108

370

+4

6.

140

99

102

341

+5

7.

240

33

60

333

-2

8.

146

41

101

288

9.

166

29

83

278

-2

10.

160

43

65

268

-4

11.

114

45

82

241

-1

12.

103

67

61

231

+2

13.

122

10

61

193

-1

14.

79

69

44

192

+5

15.

113

33

28

174

+2

16.

54

71

44

169

-1

17.

63

39

54

156

+1

18.

89

21

23

133

-2

19.

77

11

29

117

-6

20.

32

32

34

98

+2

21.

11

39

26

76

+3

22.

43

26

0

69

New

23.

15

37

11

63

+4

24.

10

34

15

59

+8

25.

18

34

7

59

+5

26.

23

0

34

57

-5

27.

4

37

9

50

+34

28.

20

22

6

48

-2

29.

1

43

2

46

+11

30.

0

43

0

43

+38

Please note that the +/- gain on this table differs from our weekly rankings page, and it is related to the ranking update of January 5.

NAVI breathing down Vitality’s neck

Natus Vincere began 2021 by securing a trophy in their first tournament of the year, BLAST Premier Global Final. Despite getting off on the wrong foot, the CIS squad bounced back in the lower bracket with victories against Complexity, G2 and Liquid before taking on the two highest-ranked teams in the world, Vitality in the consolidation final and Astralis in the grand final. NAVI’s run was all the more impressive when taking into account that they lost just two maps after being knocked down to the lower bracket in their tournament opener.

Although NAVI did beat both Astralis and Vitality in the BLAST tournament, they could not overtake the aforementioned teams in the ranking and are still in third place, but their victory does put them in hot pursuit of the French squad as they landed just four points shy of second place, closing a gap that was nearly 300 points wide at the end of 2020.

NAVI are now just four points behind Vitality

Up next for Natus Vincere will be the BLAST Premier Spring Groups, in which they will face MIBR before taking on Liquid or FaZe. But the real proving ground for NAVI – and where they will be gunning to overtake the Frenchmen – will be IEM Katowice, in which the CIS team will try to defend their title from last year’s event, the last big LAN competition before play moved online because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Virtus.pro close in on top 5

Virtus.pro have climbed to sixth place in the rankings, their highest since November 2019, when the core of this team was still reaping the rewards of their final run at the StarLadder Berlin Major and a victory at BLAST Pro Series Moscow. This time around, it comes off the back of a victory in cs_summit 7, the third tournament in a row they have won following their Flashpoint 2 and DreamHack Open December titles at the end of 2020.

Virtus.pro are in a close contest for fifth place with Liquid and Heroic

The CIS team were a force to be reckoned with in their first tournament of the year, beating NIP, FURIA, mousesports and fnatic without dropping a single map in the five series played. Dzhami “⁠Jame⁠” Ali showed particular good form in his team’s success, ending eight out of the ten maps played with 1.15+ ratings and leading nine different stats categories by the end of the event, which earned him his second career MVP.

After jumping five places in the ranking since last month’s update, Virtus.pro are now right in the middle of a hotly-contested fight for fifth place, 29 points behind Liquid and just eight above Heroic. Without a spot in IEM Katowice’s main tournament, Virtus.pro will have to fight their way through the play-in to qualify for the main event, a crucial hurdle in their aspirations to become a top-five team in the world.

FaZe drop to lowest rank in over a year

FaZe are continuing their downward trend from last year amid a roster overhaul, as they kicked 2021 off outside of the top 10, in 13th place, and have now dropped all the way down to 19th. The international squad are now on the brink of falling out of the top 20 after a disastrous 11-12th place in cs_summit 7 following losses to mousesports and MIBR.

FaZe’s woes continued at the start of the year before changes were announced

Big news came from the FaZe camp after their cs_summit 7 elimination, however, and Marcelo “⁠coldzera⁠” David and company will be hoping that the high-profile signing of Russel “⁠Twistzz⁠” Van Dulken will pay off and help revitalize a team that has been unable to regain flight after losing their star player and former in-game leader Nikola “⁠NiKo⁠” Kovač to G2 last year.

FaZe will be able to feel out their new configuration with Twistzz at BLAST Premier Spring Groups, in which the Canadian will face off against his former Liquid teammates in the Group C opening match. But the team’s first big test will come later in February, in IEM Katowice, in which they will hope to draw on a honeymoon phase to buck their negative trend in a tournament featuring a whopping $1 million prize pool.

Ninjas in trouble

NIP played their last official match of 2020 on November 25 – a 0-2 defeat to Cloud9 in the first round of the BLAST Premier Fall Showdown – and looked rusty when they returned to action in cs_summit 7, in which they recorded one more loss to the ‘Colossus’ and two against the eventual champions, Virtus.pro. The 2-1 victory against a Dignitas side barely inside the top 30 offered little consolation to the Ninjas, who are now ranked just 18th in the world.

NiP are almost outside the top 20

This is the lowest that NIP have been in the rankings since June 2017, and they could be in for more misery as they have been placed in the only BLAST Premier Spring group with three top-10 sides (Astralis, BIG and OG).

The honeymoon period following Hampus “⁠hampus⁠” Poser‘s addition is well and truly over, and the cracks in the team are all too evident. Perhaps the recent rebrand could push the management to press the reset button in an attempt to stop the bleeding?

SINNERS break into the top 30

“You will see us in top 30 next year,” Tomáš “⁠oskar⁠” Šťastný said during his official unveiling as a Sinners player, exactly two months ago. The Czech team have since climbed 40 places in the world rankings, finally breaking the top-30 barrier in the latest ranking update following a very busy month.

oskar’s experience has helped SINNERS to climb up the ladder

Sinners have played 25 official matches since the start of the year, and while results haven’t always been stellar, they have managed to defeat some established teams, including Dignitas, HellRaisers, Sangal and Lyngby Vikings. With oskar and Adam “⁠NEOFRAG⁠” Zouhar both putting up solid numbers, the team will be looking to consolidate their place in the top 30 before they can start thinking about bigger things.

Lucas Aznar Miles contributed to this story

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Categories
Counter Strike: Global Offensive

Team Ranking: January 2021 | HLTV.org

January brought the return of top-tier Counter-Strike after the player break as BLAST hosted the global final of its 2020 Premier circuit, featuring $1 million in prize money and eight teams, six of which inside the top 10 in the rankings. Natus Vincere ran rampant in the tournament and put in some performances reminiscent of last year’s IEM Katowice campaign, but it was not enough for them to overtake Astralis or Vitality in the world rankings, although the second place is now within their grasp.

One of the month’s winners was Virtus.pro, who added the cs_summit 7 trophy to the Flashpoint 2 and DreamHack Open December titles that they had won at the tail end of 2020. The CIS team, who did not drop a single map throughout the tournament, are now sixth in the world, their highest rank since November 2019.

NAVI won the first big tournament of 2021, the BLAST Premier Global Final

Smaller tournaments, such as DreamHack Open January and the OMEN WGR European Challenge, also had an impact in the lower half of the top 30, with Spirit moving up to No.14 despite making a roster change, and Dignitas, Movistar Riders and Sinners all making this month’s table.

Here’s a summary of our ranking for new readers:

Our team ranking is based on teams’ achievements over the past year (with severe decay in points throughout each month), recent form over the last two months, and performance in recent events in the last 3 months.

Each team is required to have a three-man core in order to retain their points. Due to the ongoing coronavirus outbreak, online results, which previously had a minimal effect, now carry more weight as they are also included in the ‘Achievements’ and ‘Recent Events’ sub-categories.

Below is the current top 30 table as of February 1, which goes more in-depth into how the points are distributed — or you can check our special page, where you will be able to find the latest, weekly version of our ranking. You can see the lineup for each team by hovering over their name in the table.

1.

500

200

300

1000

2.

500

247

37

784

3.

192

341

247

780

4.

157

195

135

487

5.

49

213

108

370

+4

6.

15

223

103

341

+5

7.

199

74

60

333

-2

8.

94

92

102

288

9.

131

64

83

278

-2

10.

105

97

66

268

-4

11.

58

100

83

241

-1

12.

18

151

62

231

+2

13.

110

21

62

193

-1

14.

-7

155

44

192

+5

15.

72

74

28

174

+2

16.

-34

159

44

169

-1

17.

14

87

55

156

+1

18.

63

47

23

133

-2

19.

64

24

29

117

-6

20.

-8

72

34

98

+2

21.

-37

87

26

76

+3

22.

10

59

0

69

New

23.

-32

84

11

63

+4

24.

-32

76

15

59

+8

25.

-24

76

7

59

+5

26.

23

0

34

57

-5

27.

-42

83

9

50

+34

28.

-7

49

6

48

-2

29.

-53

97

2

46

+11

30.

-54

97

0

43

+38

Please note that the +/- gain on this table differs from our weekly rankings page, and it is related to the ranking update of January 5.

NAVI breathing down Vitality’s neck

Natus Vincere began 2021 by securing a trophy in their first tournament of the year, BLAST Premier Global Final. Despite getting off on the wrong foot, the CIS squad bounced back in the lower bracket with victories against Complexity, G2 and Liquid before taking on the two highest-ranked teams in the world, Vitality in the consolidation final and Astralis in the grand final. NAVI’s run was all the more impressive when taking into account that they lost just two maps after being knocked down to the lower bracket in their tournament opener.

Although NAVI did beat both Astralis and Vitality in the BLAST tournament, they could not overtake the aforementioned teams in the ranking and are still in third place, but their victory does put them in hot pursuit of the French squad as they landed just four points shy of second place, closing a gap that was nearly 300 points wide at the end of 2020.

NAVI are now just four points behind Vitality

Up next for Natus Vincere will be the BLAST Premier Spring Groups, in which they will face MIBR before taking on Liquid or FaZe. But the real proving ground for NAVI – and where they will be gunning to overtake the Frenchmen – will be IEM Katowice, in which the CIS team will try to defend their title from last year’s event, the last big LAN competition before play moved online because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Virtus.pro close in on top 5

Virtus.pro have climbed to sixth place in the rankings, their highest since November 2019, when the core of this team was still reaping the rewards of their final run at the StarLadder Berlin Major and a victory at BLAST Pro Series Moscow. This time around, it comes off the back of a victory in cs_summit 7, the third tournament in a row they have won following their Flashpoint 2 and DreamHack Open December titles at the end of 2020.

Virtus.pro are in a close contest for fifth place with Liquid and Heroic

The CIS team were a force to be reckoned with in their first tournament of the year, beating NIP, FURIA, mousesports and fnatic without dropping a single map in the five series played. Dzhami “⁠Jame⁠” Ali showed particular good form in his team’s success, ending eight out of the ten maps played with 1.15+ ratings and leading nine different stats categories by the end of the event, which earned him his second career MVP.

After jumping five places in the ranking since last month’s update, Virtus.pro are now right in the middle of a hotly-contested fight for fifth place, 29 points behind Liquid and just eight above Heroic. Without a spot in IEM Katowice’s main tournament, Virtus.pro will have to fight their way through the play-in to qualify for the main event, a crucial hurdle in their aspirations to become a top-five team in the world.

FaZe drop to lowest rank in over a year

FaZe are continuing their downward trend from last year amid a roster overhaul, as they kicked 2021 off outside of the top 10, in 13th place, and have now dropped all the way down to 19th. The international squad are now on the brink of falling out of the top 20 after a disastrous 11-12th place in cs_summit 7 following losses to mousesports and MIBR.

FaZe’s woes continued at the start of the year before changes were announced

Big news came from the FaZe camp after their cs_summit 7 elimination, however, and Marcelo “⁠coldzera⁠” David and company will be hoping that the high-profile signing of Russel “⁠Twistzz⁠” Van Dulken will pay off and help revitalize a team that has been unable to regain flight after losing their star player and former in-game leader Nikola “⁠NiKo⁠” Kovač to G2 last year.

FaZe will be able to feel out their new configuration with Twistzz at BLAST Premier Spring Groups, in which the Canadian will face off against his former Liquid teammates in the Group C opening match. But the team’s first big test will come later in February, in IEM Katowice, in which they will hope to draw on a honeymoon phase to buck their negative trend in a tournament featuring a whopping $1 million prize pool.

Ninjas in trouble

NIP played their last official match of 2020 on November 25 – a 0-2 defeat to Cloud9 in the first round of the BLAST Premier Fall Showdown – and looked rusty when they returned to action in cs_summit 7, in which they recorded one more loss to the ‘Colossus’ and two against the eventual champions, Virtus.pro. The 2-1 victory against a Dignitas side barely inside the top 30 offered little consolation to the Ninjas, who are now ranked just 18th in the world.

NiP are almost outside the top 20

This is the lowest that NIP have been in the rankings since June 2017, and they could be in for more misery as they have been placed in the only BLAST Premier Spring group with three top-10 sides (Astralis, BIG and OG).

The honeymoon period following Hampus “⁠hampus⁠” Poser‘s addition is well and truly over, and the cracks in the team are all too evident. Perhaps the recent rebrand could push the management to press the reset button in an attempt to stop the bleeding?

SINNERS break into the top 30

“You will see us in top 30 next year,” Tomáš “⁠oskar⁠” Šťastný said during his official unveiling as a Sinners player, exactly two months ago. The Czech team have since climbed 40 places in the world rankings, finally breaking the top-30 barrier in the latest ranking update following a very busy month.

oskar’s experience has helped SINNERS to climb up the ladder

Sinners have played 25 official matches since the start of the year, and while results haven’t always been stellar, they have managed to defeat some established teams, including Dignitas, HellRaisers, Sangal and Lyngby Vikings. With oskar and Adam “⁠NEOFRAG⁠” Zouhar both putting up solid numbers, the team will be looking to consolidate their place in the top 30 before they can start thinking about bigger things.

Lucas Aznar Miles contributed to this story

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